What can be done with a hostile pair of nesting gulls on a Crown land rock formation?

What can be done with a hostile pair of nesting gulls on a Crown land rock formation?

The gulls are probably hostile because they sense a threat to their young and are attempting to keep perceived predators at bay. It’s best to stay away from them as they have the legal right to be there: Migratory birds are protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act.

Removing the eggs and nest of a migratory bird is a serious matter, and cottagers should simply give the birds a lot of space. Young birds need the opportunity to grow and propagate. But if you feel the birds are a genuine hazard and that putting up a sign to warn boaters to steer clear isn’t enough, you can contact the Canadian Wildlife Service. For nests found on Crown land, contact a local Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) office. The MNR will not remove nests that contain chicks or eggs close to hatching unless serious safety concerns leave no alternative.