7 poisonous plants

What to avoid touching and/or eating in the great outdoors

By Ruane RemyRuane Remy

Share on Facebook

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Photo by Red Raleigh

Arisaema triphyllum

Jack-in-the-pulpit grows with a long stem, three leaflets, and a cluster of red berries. Its main leaf combs over the plant to keep pollen safe; as a result, the plant is said to resemble a preacher standing behind a pulpit. It can be found flourishing in wet soils from Manitoba to eastern Canada.

The plant contains oxalate crystals that are especially concentrated in the leaves. When eaten, the crystals cause severe pain and burning in the lips, mouth, and throat, as they pierce their way through the digestive tract. In large doses, an individual’s reaction to the poison may include breathing problems, convulsions, coma, permanent liver and kidney damage, and—in very extreme cases— death.

First aid tips: If you eat any part of a jack-in-the-pulpit plant, remove remaining bits from your mouth and rinse with cold water. Then save part of the plant for identification and call the Ontario Poison Centre.


Tonight on Cottage Life

  • 06:00 pmWEEKEND RENO
  • 06:30 pmWEEKEND RENO
  • 07:00 pmGEORGE CLARKE'S AMAZING SPACES
  • 08:00 pmBUYING ALASKA
  • 08:30 pmWHAT'S FOR SALE
  • 09:00 pmEPIC - SEASON 2
  • 10:00 pmGEORGE CLARKE'S AMAZING SPACES
  • 11:00 pmBUYING ALASKA
  • 11:30 pmBUYING THE BAYOU
View Full Schedule

MOST POPULAR


Joel Buxton