Foie gras poutine

10 of the wildest poutine combinations in Canada

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French fries topped with cheese curds and smothered in gravy—it’s a gooey snack Canadians are proud to call their own. But in true Canadian fashion, this classic dish has been influenced by cultures from around the globe, and has been fused with everything from butter chicken to perogies.

Here are some of the country’s wildest poutine combinations, along with where you can find them.

Foie gras poutine

Foie gras poutine
Photo by pixelbunny.net

Gourmet meaty dishes are the specialty at Au Pied de Cochon in Montreal. Chef Martin Picard created the foie gras poutine—a rich and decadent version of the classic Québecois dish.

Roast duck poutine pizza

Roast duck poutine pizza
Photo by www.urbanspoon.com

Pizza lovers will celebrate this sinfully rich menu item at Toronto’s Bannock restaurant. Fries, curds, caramelized onions, and roast duck act as pizza toppings for a deliciously messy meal.

Perogy poutine

Photo by Smoke’s Poutinerie

Perogies topped with bacon and sour cream are decadent on their own, but imagine indulging in this treat when it’s piled on top of poutine. You can find this hearty combo at Smoke’s Poutinerie, which has locations in every Canadian province except Prince Edward Island.

Halibut poutine

Halibut poutine
Photo by www.pickydiners.com

The West Coast is the perfect place to indulge in some fresh seafood, so it’s no surprise that fish would be featured in this British Columbian version of the Quebec classic. Vancouver’s Fishworks serves poutine with goat cheese gravy, garlic confit, and sundried tomato drizzled with balsamic.

Beef brisket poutine

Beef brisket poutine
Photo by mtlfoodpics.blogspot.com

The Smoque Shack in Ottawa is home to absolutely mouth-watering combination of classic poutine and shaved beef brisket, which is smothered in barbecue chicken gravy. The Texas-styled brisket is brined and rubbed, then slowly smoked over hickory and Quebec maple charcoal. If you’re not a beef fan they’ve got pulled chicken and pork, too.

Poutine spring rolls

Spring rolls
Photo by yelp.ca

Pacific Junction Hotel in Toronto replaces plum sauce for gravy for its spring rolls stuffed with fries and cheese curds. Diners can choose between oxtail or caramelized onion gravy.

Butter chicken poutine

Butter chicken poutine
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Butter Chicken is usually served with rice but at Original Joe’s you can get curried tomato cream sauce and roasted chicken breast over Kennebec fries. It’s served with cheese curds, spiced yogurt, and chopped cilantro. There are Original Joe’s locations in B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.

Cheeseburger poutine

Cheeseburger poutine
Photo by Sean Go/Flickr.com

This might be the most North American poutine ever, taking ingredients from an American cheeseburger—ground beef, cheese, pickles, and ketchup—and adding them to Canada’s most famous cultural dish. You can find this combination at Bouchard’s Poutinery, which sets up every year at Canada’s National Exhibition (CNE).

Lobster poutine

lobster poutine
Photo by kelticlodge.ca

Since you can find Halibut poutine on Canada’s West Coast, it only makes sense that you can get fresh Atlantic lobster on your poutine when you’re on the East Coast. At The Grill at CUT, you can dine on poutine topped with fresh lobster meat, chives, hollandaise, and halloumi cheese while overlooking the Halifax Harbour.

Corn dog poutine

Hot dog poutine
Photo by yelp.ca

In case a classic poutine wasn’t enough to satisfy your late-night cravings, Montreal’s late-night poutinerie La Banquise offers various poutines topped with sliced hot dogs and even corn dogs.